Spotlight on the Artist- Brian Murphy

 

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Brian Murphy was born in staten Island New York in may 21.
1973. Originally discovering art  thru the graffiti that was   Abundant during a time when cardboard coated ever city corner and break dancers battled for real estate with nothing but the skill Of art and dance. In 1992 begun a life long career as a  fine artist beginning with  a formal apprenticeship with Steve Ferguson at the Ink Spot in Elizabeth N.J.    
Although struggling with homelessness and addiction for many years was able to prevail  in 2000 and continue life with a new found perspective and understanding of human nature. Since then opened Third Dimension Studio in Marshall’s creek p.a  and has dedicated his life to his Art and has won countless awards tattooed tv stars and radio personalities and his art  published in Hungary. Poland. France.and  rite here  in the U.S. A to name a few. He  is currently working on a series of instructional videos at his Tattoo gallery located in Marshall’s Creek Pa. And  living out  the American dream with his crazy  def pit bull ozzy. 

 
I paint from the inside out and my work is primarily improvised. My artwork fill a void in my life and often takes an exploratory look at the world around me,from social evils to distort reality and blurred  landscapes. My paintings blend the familiar with the frightening ,the beautiful with the revolting,the tasteful with the terrible. 
I allow the viewer to draw there conclusions about my work;they should add brush strokes to my canvas with there mind. My work allows my story and the viewers’ to intertwine,fully completing the painting. – Brian Murphy
 
 
[as interviewed by Ian Robert McKown 7.27.2012]
One thing I’ve noticed when looking at your work you seem to often focus on larger allegorical ideas. I see strife and struggle, and even  what i feel looks to be a struggle with addiction.  How much of your personal experiences to you bring to the table when working on a piece?
 
For me finding  meaning  is what i am looking for in my work. Especially that I tattoo all day and cosmetics is the primary focus. The work i do actually saved my life because i was living in a homeless shelter do to drug addiction. And was all i had left to utilize in order to get back on my feet . I don’t make a concise decision to tell a specific story with the work but  it often does end up going back to subjects i feel need to be remembered or told. So i would have to say yes most of my personal experiences and even events that have happened to others come out in the work.I feel like my job as an artist is to share what i have seen in my life , almost like a diary of images in a way.
 
 
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I’ve known you  off and on for something like five  or more years and you seem to be developing a looser, more suggestive style rather than some of your earlier works which were akin to some of the representational realist masters.  Is this a conscious shift or are we seeing a natural progression?
 
To be honest i had some very good opportunities with a well known curator that has been extremely successful in the art market and museum market. He gave me a chance to put a body of work together for a show i believe in April of 2009 but insisted that i approach it in a more representational manner.And looking back at it i am glad i did it because it helped me to approach my work differently. Its like there are two sides to the art world the loser work artist believe that realism is scholastic and  lacks emotion. I was told that artist that only work in a realistic manner is almost like there snuggy blanket because they are more concerned about what people will think about there work rather then having there own vision..Then the opposite would be the loser guys just suck and they cant really paint and all that.So in the end i got to see both sides of the story and came to the conclusion that even tho i know  that if i wanted to i can paint women’s faces with lines all over them and horror portraits and the tattoo world would support me and my name would get out more but i choose to develop my own vision.So what your seeing is the process of me trying to find my own vision.I am in no way saying that horror work ect  is not good or doesn’t take talent to do  and i will do more of it but i am just saying thats not my vision.
 
Speaking of the Masters, i know from out conversations you have a great deal of respect and love for early and modern masters.  Care to cite some of your influences?
 
Rubens, John Singer Sergeant even tho he was slightly later, Vermeer, Caravaggio, Holbein, Rembrandt; and like in the tattoo world there are so many others that are extremely talented but just never got mentioned.
 
 
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Id think that we an both agree that in tattooing we are seeming many old masters techniques being employed to a high degree of skill, yet in the contemporary are world there are less and less artists looking towards the past for guidance.  Thoughts?
 
I look at is like you have a musician that studies for years and becomes a master.In the end know one ever even hears about him but do you know who they did here about? Its the druggy that fell over half way thru the song.Thats the guy there going to buy his album not the guy with the talent.  The world is in chaos so why shouldn’t the art be.We live in a know body gets left behind approach and i think its just easier to perform a jerker then a master piece.Take the average guy walking thru the met museum looking at masters thats not an artist, he’s saying to himself thats a picture of lincoln thats a picture of washington and not really understanding how much work is involved to bring something to that level.I think people are bored with that subject matter and are constantly seeing images in every way shape and form via Facebook ,movies,ect   Times are different  back then everyone got together and went to see the paintings on a saturday night all these mages come so easily now so most people overlook it all in my opinion. It almost seems like the contemporary art world is driven buy artist that are just trying to shock and don’t really care about technique ect..  But mostly back then everything was structured artist couldn’t get crazy because of the religious influences ect. Know its just chaos in general and people would benefit from looking at the masters for more then just painting i think for living also.
How much has working with brush on canvas helped your tattooing? Are you seeing a bit of cross-inspiration, or do you keep the two as seperate animals?
 
It influences greatly and it does become stressful and very limiting to attempt to create works on skin equal to the canvas.On skin there is just way to many things that have to align in order for the tattoo to be successful. The person has to have the correct skin they have to be patient they have to not talk your ear off they have to trust you they have to be willing to come back so you can finish and a bunch of other things. So yes it helped me but its also stressful trying to achieve  the same quality.
 
 
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There is a growing movement amongst tattooers where we are seeing a more open mind towards teaching one another fine art and non-tattoo related art.  How do you feel about this shift given you stared tattooing was a much more closed community?
 
I definitely started in a closed type situation  and with all of these tv shows there are way to many people that maybe drew a cool picture of eddie from iron maiden in art class that think they should tattoo. As fare as teaching fine art i see that as a positive.For me i would teach someone art a lot faster then tattooing and believe they should be taught art way before they think about even tattooing not the other way around. Every day i get emails on Facebook asking if i can teach them but when you look at there profile you see no art they have done so again going back to the know body gets left behind stuff.
 
 
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What kind of materials do you prefer to work with? (including paint types, brush types and surface types)
 
I like many types earlier i used the air brush allot then pastels.Lately i have been enjoying watercolor also.I use Fabriano cold press paper and Holbein paints.As fare as the oil painting i like both gesso board and canvas also.I never got to technical with the types of canvas i believe for the most part its alabama primed canvas that i stretch myself and gesso board that i order thru Dick Blick.The paints are a mixture of rembrant,some winsor and some holbein.I like the full transparent paints for creating out of focus edges. I use a combination of colicky sable brushes which are round for more detailed work some larger filberts and flats also and really like the royal langnickel brushes they have really long hairs and create some really nice edges for alla prima style work.For a medium liquid is good although i paint more directly lately and don’t glaze much and i really like Gamsol its the only one for me that doesn’t smell at all and can be also used as a medium.
 
 
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Have you had much experience with the fine art community?  Any plans for shows in the near future?
 
Like i mentioned before i have had some experience with the fine art community. I have done a pretty good amount of shows to date which can be extremely stressful when you tattoo all day but i do love the learning experience that comes with seeing all your work at the show in a different light and saying to myself ok so were do i go from here.I  will also  be having a show on sep. 8 at sacred gallery located in Soho in Manhattan.
 
 
Looking back at yor earlier works, what do you see as the biggest shifts you’ve made?
 
The biggest shift is to paint more directly and rely  on making the correct shape size color value brush stroke rather then take a dry brush and blend everything.I feel like its closer to tattooing because we don’t have the lugtury of blending our tattoos with a brush..Along with really trying to to not be concerned about what i think other people want to see.
 
 
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What can we expect to see from you in the next 5 to 10 years?
My goal is to develop my vision on canvas and then bring it to skin.I would also like to make some videos to share some of what i learned thru the years would be nice.
 
 
(B.Murphy Fine art on skin)
Third Dimension Studio
18 village center
East Stroudsburg P.A
18301
(570)223-6602
 
 
 
 

“Addie” – Watercolor Tutorial by Gayla Schuett

 


Hello Fellow Artists and thank you for allowing me to give a step by step here at the new and fabulous blog!!

This is a progressive tutorial on how I did a watercolor of “Addie”, size:  23X13.  Paper:  I always use Arches and typically 140 lb. cold press.  The weight of this paper works better in my experience, as it holds water well without a lot of puddling and it takes scrubbing and mult -layering somewhat better than 200-300 pound. Always begin with a decent pencil sketch, not too heavy as to show thru later and not too light so that you lose your lines in the washes.  Also…very important to tape down the paper with white masking as opposed to colored, the color can be a definite distraction.  Keep your water tray in front of you with a large sponge submerged inside,  great for removing excess water from your brush.  Using a towel to remove excess pigment from your brush is very helpful as well in controlling the amount of water/pigment.   Practice with this, you will see what I mean.

The sketch is in place (composition is a must as you know, in portraiture) and I use miskit to mask out all the areas I want to leave white.  In this particular painting, I did an experiment with gradually masking over painted areas throughout the various stages of the painting to give variety to the values of color.  Key note on miskit: don’t bother with using brushes first dipped in soap and then the loathsome attempt of rescuing the brush for re-use.  I have found that a rubber tipped nib works great as well as a thick darning needle-excellent for thin lines. Even spattering with a toothbrush works well, so long as you use good control and know exactly where you want those light areas to be. Allow plenty of drying time for the masking fluid before applying water.  If you know that your background will be dark, put your signature in with miskit as well.

Using a 2″ kolinsky brush (they hold sooooo much water!) I wet down the entire face area.  Then using a 1 1/2″ flat brush I used a mix of paynes gray and cobalt in a creamy consistency, began applying the color working light to dark.  The great thing about watercolor is that depending on the amount of dilution, the same color can carry a little or a lot of pigment without the addition of more colors.  When adding a stronger value, it’s a good idea to stroke the brush on the back side of your hand to test the liquidity, make sure the paint is “tight” and doesn’t allow for flowing or “blossoms”.  The number one rule of watercolor is: if the shine is gone from the paper….STOP!!  Wait for the paper to completely dry (you can use a hairdryer to speed it up, however it may lighten the true color of the pigment) and then you may add more washes to achieve the exact values you desire.  Truly, technique in watercolor is all about managing the water itself.  Never puddle your paper, brush on your initial wet areas with care, as if you are actually “painting”.

 

In this step, you can see that after allowing the paint to dry, I have added more masking fluid to the face to retain some of those lighter tones.  Once dry, simply repeated the same colors using more saturation especially in the hair and around the eyes using a round fine point brush combined with shaders.  You can really see the whites beginning to pop at this point.  I then added a bit of magenta to the cobalt to come up with a violet tone to lay in the hairline and some of the shadowed areas of the face.

Background:  Typically a background would be the final stage of a watercolor painting.  However, in this case, knowing that the floating hairs in front of the face would most likely be left white (yes I change my plans in mid gear sometimes) it was important to block in the background now.  Using the wet on wet technique again, I repeated the same colors using the wide wash brush FULL of paint using a criss- cross technique.  Walk away, grab a sandwich, this takes quite some time to dry.

With the background washed in you now get a great visual of your highlights, even with the masking fluid still in place.  This is where I “tweak” the painting, generally going wet into dry, moving the color around and fading the edges of the additional washes as I go.  There is so much manipulation you can do  in the wet into dry technique to achieve exactly what you were going for and it is really good time to pop in complimentary colors at this point.  After everything is completely dry (and your paper will not feel “cool”…( a good rule to use to check for moisture level) you will start to remove your miskit…for the magic!  You can buy the erasers for this but what works much faster and doesn’t smear the thicker paint that may be below, is to use masking tape…low tack.  Simply ball up the masking tape and gently use a pulling action at the masking sites.  This was a discovery passed on to me by a dear friend who really knows his watercolors and I wish I would have had this tip years ago.  Once the masking fluid has all been removed, it is time to scrub out a bit of the harshness of the lines (yes, there are “scrubbers” out there in all sizes, be sure to buy them and use them with a light touch, you will love them), apply soft color over other parts of them and make the true reveal of your painting.

This particular size of paper leads to a generally “larger than life” head shot and has a great impact when hanging on a wall in a 3″ mat.  I like to use either start white or plain black for portraits depending on the tones of the portrait itself.  Keeping the matting simple on a watercolor leads your eye to your target…the painting and not the mat.  So, in closure, manage your water and you will have a successful watercolor painting regardless of your subject.  I hope this helps one or many of you to attempt a medium that you wanted to try, but were just afraid to take the plunge.  Enjoy yourself!!

 

https://www.facebook.com/gschuett2

Step by Step- Nosferatu by Jed Leiknes

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Hi! I’d like to give you a little rundown of a painting, if that is okay. Let’s begin!

Tonight’s project is a larger portrait of Nosferatu the vampire, or at least his broke cousin Ron. Their dads are twin brothers. I started with a stretched canvas, which I believe was 36×24″ in size. Using sap green, burnt umber and raw umber thinned down with turpentine, I laid down a quick background knowing that later, the overall hue would continue to show through my paints as I built them up, forever giving our boy a bit of a sickly pallor.

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I begin sketching him in with brush and the same two or three thinned-down paints I used for the background. WhiIe i try to stick to shapes and shadows initially, I am kind of pulling the imagery out of my head so I’m guilty of doing abit of contour linework. As long as I’m not leaving those flat borders around things later on, it doesn’t bug me all that much. As I go, I begin wiping out spots where I think light will hit. Things like nose, cheekbone, forehead all get hit with a bit of turp and then wiped off either with a rag or in my case, some incredibly cheap paper towel that has a tendency to crumble after a bit of this.

Once I’m fairly satisfied with the overall shape of my dude, I’ll take another quick go at the background with the same three paints. Between the initial backdrop, the sketch and the second background pass, the only difference has been brush size and the amount of turp I use.

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At this point I’ll begin scaling back the amount of turp I use with each stage, and increasing the amount of medium I incorporate into my pigments (While I typically use Galkyd, for this project I’ve been using small amounts of Liquin. Each does their job and well, for me it’s a matter of what I’m trying to accomplish in a given painting). I’ll then get to blocking midtones and shadows in the face. I’ll continue using my sap green as well as a bit of Alizarin Crimson and adjusting with my raw umber and a quick-dry white; I’ll also tend to use Payne’s Gray and even venetian red. I don’t have a solid rhyme to what goes where, and tend to mix paint on the brush. It’s lazy and undisciplined but it also gives a piece a fun bit of energy. At the end of the day however, it still boils down to an awareness of value
and hue. Saturation can come later.

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Before too long, and while the paint is still fairly wet, I’ll begin refining shapes and maybe even jumping ahead to texture… the two tend to even each other out as I go. For Ronsferatu, I wanted to give the guy just this incredibly dry, cracked skin. Keeping a basic sense of where my light source is, this is probably where I have the most fun. As I go I may hit opaques, refine AND add texture all at once. It’s a bigger piece so I’m after getting the underpainting where I want it, I’m just sort of moving paint around as I come to an area.

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With time running out and precious minutes of sleep being ignored, I decide to focus specifically on the mouth for the rest of the night, taking care not to get too cartoony and flat with my shadows and highlights. It’s the easiest thing in the world to just blast a piece of art with sharp white highlights. But by the end of this, there
should only be a few distinct areas where pure white is used.

Next time we’ll hit the top of his forehead, sort out a background and think about glazing. Thanks for reading!

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https://www.facebook.com/vitaminjed

http://www.leiknesoils.com

 

Spotlight on the Artist- Josh Wool as interviewed by Jon McKenzie

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Josh Wool interviewed by Jon McKenzie 7.21.2012

Josh Wool ladies and gentleman: a fellow Southerner.  While I grew up in the much more refined and well mannered state of Texas, you were plagued with burden of thriving in Virginia.  A quick Google search found one expat describing his hometown in Virginia as, “toothless, low IQ, belief in creationism for the morbidly obese”.    Certainly, you don’t share this dejected individual’s animosity and ego-maniacal negativity and you wear the Southern badge proudly.  How did growing up in Virginia Beach mold you into the Josh Wool we know and love today?

Growing up in a Southern beach town was great, surfing, fishing, bike rides on the boardwalk, it was a pretty laid back lifestyle. I never felt completely at home there though. I moved back to Charleston, South Carolina, where I’m originally from, for college and immediately felt at home. I think it’s there that really shaped me as a young adult. There’s so much history and culture, and it’s pretty cosmopolitan for a small Southern city. It was also the first time I’d been exposed to the darker underbelly of life in the South, there’s great wealth in Charleston, but also a lot of poverty and seeing those two worlds be so close in proximity, yet  totally segregated really stuck with me. 

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Describe when and how you came into the affinity and, ultimately, the study of art and when did you realize your were an artist?

I was interested in art from an early age, but never really found an outlet for visual art until just a few years ago when I picked up a camera. I wanted to build boats when I was a kid, the beauty of shape and form really appeal to me, so I guess that’s what started it all and still resonates to some extent in my photographs.  I don’t know that I’d call myself an artist, I feel like that word should be reserved for those who paint, sculpt, draw etc. I’d say I’m more of a craftsman, I have a particular set of skills to get a job done, but there are artistic elements involved in that too. 

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You have are now a New York City transplant.  Describe the juxtaposition of the South to New York, which is known the world around as a melting pot as it were.  Do you think your Southern roots tend to help you in the Big Apple or hinder you?

New York is a totally different world; it’s fast paced and can be unforgiving. However I think the idea of NYC is much more intimidating than the reality of it. It was definitely overwhelming at first, but getting a feel for the city came easily for me and I adapted to the pace surprisingly well. It does demand that you be at your best, there’s no tolerance here for sub par anything.   There’s nowhere else that offers the kinds of opportunities that NYC does, but nothing comes easy, you really have to work. I’ve also found that it’s the world’s biggest small town. I run into people I know here all the time, in the city as well as in my neighborhood in Brooklyn.  The main difference I see beyond the obvious between NYC and the South is cultural diversity, there are so many different cultures here and it’s really exciting to see that. The trade off for all the opportunity is people stacked on people and the cost of living is borderline insane. The jury is still out on whether or not being from the south is a plus or a minus, but I can say living here makes me appreciate where I came from.

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When I first met you, you were a big fan of the culinary arts, and arguably more recognized as an artisan of food than a photographer.  You recently mentioned to me that cooking has taken a back seat to your photography.  Now, unless you are McDonald’s, a creation in the edible arts is subject to the biological demise of decomposition, or hopefully digestion, leaving itself little time to be enjoyed.  Did photography offer a more timeless form of expression to you?  What inspired the transition?

I never really looked at cooking or food as art. While there are artistic aspects to it, it’s more of a trade or a craft. It takes a solid foundation of technique and knowledge to manipulate raw materials to reach an end product, the artistic aspect comes in on how it’s presented, but at the end of the day that presentation isn’t going to change the taste. Function must come before form. Even more so I think style comes into play more than art does in food. It’s that style that sets people apart. Any asshole can make a mess on a plate and call it art, but more than likely it won’t taste good.   Photography is definitely along the same lines for me, but to answer the question, it does seem to be a more timeless way to express myself; the images don’t get eaten…hopefully.

I picked up a camera as a way to keep myself from going stir-crazy. I had surgery on both hands and both elbows three years ago as a result of carpel and ulnar tunnel syndrome, I was out of work for 6 weeks and during that time bought a camera and started taking photos around my neighborhood. Once I started photographing people I got hooked and realized I had some raw talent, and the rest as they say is history.

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Many photographers choose to explore elements of the human condition and (speaking broadly) sociology.  What facets of character do you find most curious, and what facets of personality do you find most enjoyable to interpret?

I like exploring what’s real. A lot of times when you point a camera in someone’s face they put up their picture persona, freeze, or get embarrassed, in some way they put up a wall.  The real reward for me is getting past that wall and capturing some real element of their personality, be it serious or silly or anything in between. Sorrow, heartache, longing, and angst are also big wins for me, there’s a certain beauty to those things that’s less than typical, but no less valid.  There’s an intimacy that comes with photographing someone and that’s very important to me that I convey that in a photograph.

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You’ve expressed that it is important to you that a part of you gleams through in your photography.  How much of Josh Wool is in a photograph of a model, and what would you like the viewer to understand about you in your work?

I think a lot of my personality comes through in what I shoot. I’m more about subtly than being in your face. Someone told me recently that my photos are really quiet, and that makes total sense as I tend to be a quiet person. I am an observer, much more comfortable not being in the limelight, and it’s pretty amazing what you see and hear when you actually take the time to look and listen. There’s a particular intensity that I think, or at least hope, comes through in my photos and again that’s a reflection of my personality. Finally, there’s always some sort of beauty be it tragic or conventional, I’m a hopeless romantic at heart.

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An underlying chorus in your process is noticeably darker themes and you mentioned targeting “honest and real life portrayals”, and you show an interest in the musings of dynamic characters like Hunter S. Thompson and Henry Rollins.  Would you say you feel most at home among the avant-garde and individualistic?

I’m a loner Dottie…I’m a rebel. Seriously though, I’ve always been an outsider, fiercely independent, sometimes solitary, and had shall we say had a slight aversion to authority. I’ve always identified with counter culture, but never wore the uniform. I have a really low tolerance for bullshit, so guys like Thompson and Rollins resonate with me,  they tell it like it is and aren’t afraid to be honest even  if it isn’t popular.  With the advent of social media I feel like people put these false or inflated versions of themselves out into the world and do it for long enough that they start believing their own lies instead of just being themselves. So yeah, I tend to relate to the individualists, the weirdoes, the eccentrics.

Ps. Get off my lawn hippie.  

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Much of you final products are shown in black and white or muted color palettes, often in high contrast lighting.  How do these techniques lend themselves to your objectives as a photographer?

I’ve loved black and white photography since I was a kid, some of the most iconic, dramatic images to me are in monochrome. For me it adds an element of drama and starkness that you can’t get with color photographs. I think its part of my personality too…I’m not about bright and flashy. I like things to be understated at times and muted colors or monochrome allows me to do that.  I’ve recently been getting away from the high contrast lighting in favor of softer ambient light and have a lot of exploring I want to do with that.  Not every image is good just because it’s black and white though…I shoot a color photo completely differently than I would a black and white, it’s not about just throwing it in photoshop clicking desaturate. 

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What can clients expect when they work with Josh Wool?

A reaaaal good time.  All kidding aside, if someone hires me they can expect to reach their creative goals in a timely professional manner,  and know that I will do everything in my power to give them the best possible product I am capable of. I bring creativity, a unique perspective, and skill to the table. 

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A common understanding amongst the Process Atelier artists is a mutual respect and admiration for fellow artists’ direction.  Certainly, you are no exception and I hope to see great things become of this talent that seems to be so inherent in you.  Where would you like to see yourself in 5 years?

Oh man…this is tough, right now it’s tough to know what next month holds.  Five years from now…hopefully paying my bills through photography.  My ideal five year plan…shooting enough commercial and editorial work to afford me a dedicated dark room and the time to explore my personal projects. I’m dying to start shooting large format and doing wet plate photography.

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I need headshots to pander to b-grade Dallas based talent agents, so I can get on “America’s Got Talent”.  I can do this thing where I flick my cheek and it sounds like a leaky faucet.  Is this beneath you?

Money talks my friend. I’m not above shooting anything, especially if it’s paid. Just like anything else in life, every once in a while you have to take a bite of the shit sandwich so you don’t starve. 

Thanks for speaking to me with such candid fervor and not doing that weird photographer thing where they make eye contact for too long and then ask me what my soul smells like.

I see what you’re doing there…trying to use the reverse psychology on me…not going to work this time Tex.

It’s been a pleasure and I’m humbled to be included in this fine group of artists. To view my work you can visit my website: www.joshwool.com or my blogwww.joshwool.tumblr.com  for bookings and general inquiriesjosh@joshwool.com  and if you want to follow my ramblings on twitter its @JoshWoolphoto

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 Jon McKenzie

https://processatelier.wordpress.com/2012/07/16/interview-with-jon-mckenzie/

www.facebook.com/pantsonducks

Woman with Serpent- Step by Step with Ian Robert McKown

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  • I was reminded that I had to pick this piece up from Landlocked show at Kaze Gallery here in Denver, and thought that I had taken enough in-progress pics to do a mini “how to” on this piece.  here it is!

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  • Step one was to begin with an idea.  this piece was actually dictated by the size and shape of the frame I’d been given as a gift a couple years prior. I believe it was some sort of coffee-table dish with a mirrored surface.  I liked the frame and decided that if i removed enough of the mirrored backing I could have a bit of a ghostly and “antique” look for anything I would put behind it.  It was easy enough to take a few new flat razors and scrape away the parts I wanted to remove, and then clean the glass with a bit of turpentine.

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  • The next step was to tailor a design to fit the frame. This meant a vertical and oval composition.  I had been drawing quite a few “fancy ladies” and this seemed to work for the space.  Beyond that, this painting was for a show that was featuring art from many of Colorado’s tattooers.  So even though much of my work is quite a bit more “painterly”, I figured I’d tailor this to be a bit more tattoo-esque.
  • If I’m not mistaken I had intended on including possibly the Serpent’s head on the top of the composition of perhaps a third rose.  but as the drawing progressed this seem to work well for my needs.  This stage was done with prismacolor’s Carmine Red pencils on Canson tracing paper.  I beliee in a more “sketchy” approcach, so if you lok you can see how many elements were sketched several times over before I decided on the final shaped.  The darker areas were where I was going in to the piece to try and solidify the major lines.

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  • Although this picture doesn’t qualify as a step, it shows me testing how the layout will work within the frame.  Apparently it was taken with an Instagram filter (apologies)

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  • Fast forward a bit.  Oce I was satisfied with the overall design and size I made a photo copy and brought it home to tranfer onto some  Crescent 110lb cold-pressed illustration board.  before transferring the image i took the time to do a light wash of burnt umber liquid acrylics on the board (made by J.W. Rowley). while that dried i lightly charcoaled the back of the photocopied drawing and with a pen, lightly traced the major lines onto the illustration board.  Then I inked in all the lines using a brush-tip Pentel marker or pen.

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  • Next, I began coloring the piece using different strength of diluted washed.  I used a cool grey, earth green and burnt umber.  I worked each color separately until each part was the right values and worked well with the rest of the piece.  Although this was more of an illustrative piece, I kept the light source coming from the same direction (for the most part). Before adding the color I did so some under shadowing with a diluted drawing ink in the hair and a bit here and there to reinforce the darkest areas.

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  • At this point I used a drawing black ink (Talens) to strengthen the darks along with some soft-bodied acrylic red to color in the blood and some soft-bodied white to make the highlights pop.  I went back over any of the linework that had lost its strength  with the same brush-tip pen.

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  • This last pic shows the finished product right before I cut the board.  I made a small “washed” with foam core that went between the frame and the painting to give a bit more depth to the final product.

Thanks for looking!

http://www.errantephemera.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kaze-Gallery/200974526800

Guitar Town Charity Auction

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For Immediate Release
Copper Mountain in Denver
Contact: Eric Matelski at ArtPimpInfo@mac.com 303-898-4350
August 10-12 for the 5th Year Copper Mountain will be hosting Guitar Town and for the 4th year the acclaimed Art Guitar Silent Auction returns to Guitar Town. The Art Guitar Silent Auction features a unique Collection of guitars crafted, painted, and designed by Colorado artists.
On July 27th, 6-9 P.M. catch a sneak preview of Guitar Town and 20 new Art Guitars at Kanon Collective 766 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, CO 80204.
For this one night only event guests will have the chance to preview 20 new art guitars and be the fist to place a bid on these great pieces of art. These Art Guitars are created from damaged guitars, kindly donated by the Guitar Center of Denver. Proceeds from the Art Guitar Silent Auction go to benefit MusicCares. MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. MusiCares also focuses the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community.
This night guest will also get a chance to preview some of the musical talent of Guitar Town. One of Guitar Town’s featured performers, Jazz Guitarist Sean McGowan will play a intimate set in Kanon Collective’s Court Yard.
P.S. If you miss this one night show but would like to check out these Art Guitars before they head up to Copper Mountain Guitar Town. They will be on display at Guitar Center1585 S. Colorado Boulevard, Denver, CO (303) 759-9100 ‎from July 29th through August 5th.
Angela Kanyvianakis
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Dan Ericson “Dunn”
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Ian Robert McKown
Jennifer Mosquers (front)
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(back)
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Laurie Maves
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Naomi Haverland
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There several more guitars waiting to be photographed and this enrty will be updated as I get the photos. Also, look for an interview or some other content regarding Eric Matelski (the art pimp) in future entries!
links to some of the participating artists:
www.naomihaverland.com/
http://www.thesigntologist.com/
www.lauriemavesart.com/

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More Artists contributing

We have had a great turnout of artists willing to contribute to the site!  I’ll be publishing more content by weeks end, but until then feel free to check out these artists work:

 

Clyde Steadman

https://www.facebook.com/Clyde.Steadman.Fine.Art

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Kans Eightynine

https://www.facebook.com/kanz89

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Alana Forsyth

http://www.petportraitsbyalanaforsyth.weebly.com

 

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Sean King

https://www.facebook.com/sean.king.96343

 

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Rick Beaupre

http://www.rbeaupre.weebly.com

 

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Check out their work!  You’ll be seeing interviews, instructional articles and much more of their work in the weeks to come.  Thanks for stopping by!